The Houston Chronicle’s Abortive Reporting

April 12, 2012 5:22 am 1 comment

In violation of 30 years of Supreme Court precedent, the Affordable Care Act requires that states fund abortions, and specific abortion providers, as part of state Medicaid coverage. Apart from the obvious ethical problems with the federal government mandating that tax dollars be used to coerce the termination of fetuses, issues of crony capitalism are also at work. If the federal government required that states prop up specific Fortune 500 corporations with citizen tax dollars as part of a political agenda, in direct contravention of established principles of private-public sector separation (except in cases where the federal government directly purchases industries or has contracts with companies) would not public outcry be substantial? After all, why should we be required to fund a business with which we may or may not agree? Is this the new America?

And yet, writers at the Texas Tribune and Houston Chronicle report as if those who oppose mandatory funding of named abortion providers, e.g. Planned Parenthood, are costing the state of Texas needed federal tax dollars. If these dollars come at the cost of the rule of law, as defined by SCOTUS precedent beginning with Roe v. Wade, which prohibits federal funding of abortions, then these are dollars rightly refused. Those who enacted the Affordable Care Act, and the office of the President, should be made legally accountable for the illicit provisions therein, including the seemingly innumerable and sometimes hidden abortion mandates. Neither Congress nor the President are given the authority to impose personal moral preferences on fellow citizens if such preferences stand in direct violation of case law and the US Constitution. The “supremacy clause” is not supreme when laws enacted are unconstitutional.

Why has the Chronicle, citing the Tribune, stacking the deck so transparently against Texas GOP leadership, who are merely upholding the law in Texas? Could it be that these publications receive the patronage of abortion providers who stand to gain from the top-down crony capitalism emanating from Washington? Think Progress reports that Planned Parenthood is now suing Texas for exercising its lawful right to opt-out of federal funding because it greedily seeks federal funding in the most prosperous state with the highest return potential. Whatever happened to the days when abortion clinics could slaughter human beings with dignity and honesty?

As the Chronicle writes,

Texas is losing more than $30 million in annual federal funding for the Women’s Health Program over the state’s decision to force Planned Parenthood clinics out of the Medicaid program. Gov. Rick Perry has vowed that the state will find the money, despite a bleak budget, to continue operating the contraception and cancer screening program without federal help.

In reading this, it would seem that the key issue is the loss of the $30 million, and not the reason for its loss. This is subtle card shuffling, but is replicated in other Chronicle articles on the subject.

Abortion providers and their allies do not have a “right” to federal funds, which are in reality, the hard-earned dollars of American citizens (a majority of whom oppose abortion), and the coverage of the Chronicle and its affiliates should include information on the legal implications of the abortion mandate, rather than shamelessly skewing coverage to isolated discussions of cost.

1 Comment

  • They don’t even try to hide their liberal bias. Texas did the right thing and it annoys the heck out of the Chronicle.

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